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Bethesda Stream Teases of a Possible Fallout Game

May 29, 2018. A day that no one on Twitch expected a surprise livestream by Bethesda Game Studios themselves (www.twitch.tv/bethesda). So what was in the stream? Nothing but a Pip-Boy bobblehead and a TV that displayed Fallout’s signature Vault-Tec “Please Stand By” static screen. That was it, really. But this is Fallout we are talking about here. Even if Todd Howard just livestreamed himself doing an ASMR whispering “Fallout” or “Skyrim Remastered” over and over again, people are still going to flock to the stream. And in the case of Bethesda’s broadcast, it peaked over 140,000 viewers.

The stream took almost 2 hours before it stopped altogether. Word spread like wildfire when Bethesda suddenly broadcasted to the world with a mysterious live stream that does not give out much except for that feeling of excitement for a brand new Fallout game. If you noticed during the stream (https://www.twitch.tv/videos/266959469), there were some appearances by the Bethesda team: one would be prancing with balloons while another simply just did a thumb up in front of the screen.

They really did not give out anything much other than the confirmation that a new Fallout game will be released very soon, most likely around October or November of 2018. What is going to be certain is that the studio could reveal a new trailer soon maybe tomorrow or during the weekend. After all, this is what Bethesda does everytime they tease their audience with a brand new game in the series, whether it’s Fallout, The Elder Scrolls or Doom.

Here are some clips from the livestream:

The last time we saw Bethesda Game Studios did this was back in May 2015 with Fallout 4. It was a similar tease as to the one yesterday: a live stream that only had the words “Please Stand By”, all in Vault-Tec fashion. The next day, the gaming community cried in joy—Fallout 4’s worldwide premiere trailer came out and everyone was suddenly hyped. The next months leading before its release, Todd Howard, the lead designer and director of Fallout 4, did nothing but showcase the beauty of the post-apocalyptic Boston wasteland and showing all the possibilities that you can do in the game, from crafting weapons, stealing the Power Armor, having a Companion and building your shelter. Who wouldn’t be excited for a more colorful take of the irradiated American wasteland?

Todd Howard even released a spin-off game for mobile devices called Fallout Shelter—a handheld app in which players can become the Overseer and manage all the people that inhabit in it, from assigning them to cater food, maintain the water and electricity, going out to the deadly wasteland to gather resources, and even matchmake the opposing sexes to mate and reproduce for the glory of repopulating the Vault. The best part about it, according to Howard, is that there are no pay-to-win microtransactions at all; a direct hit against Supercell’s Clash of Clans.

Both games, Fallout 4 and Fallout Shelter became a massive success—Fallout 4 sold more than 12 million copies and grossed more than $750 million within 24 hours on November 16, 2015, surpassing Call of Duty Black Ops 3, according to a news article by Fortune (http://fortune.com/2015/11/16/fallout4-is-quiet-best-seller/). Fallout 4 became Bethesda’s fastest income within just a week and had the highest concurrent players on PC at the same time, peaking at 470,000 players.

While the game sold like hotcakes, the consumers, however, had mixed reviews—most of which have said that the very foundation of strategic planning and slow-paced action for which the series has been known for is absent in the 4th iteration. Some even didn’t like the story at all, leading to a rather weak ending with only two choices. Some players even said that the shelter-building was just a nuisance and not really important if you can just buy a premade property. And with the characters, nobody was really fond of them. Except maybe Piper. As for the music, most of the official songs were rehashed from both Fallout 3 and Fallout New Vegas including “I Don’t Want to Set the World on Fire” by the Ink Spots and “Jingle Jangle Jingle” by Kay Kyser. In short, half of the fans felt underwhelmed by the game.

Of course, with such mixed reactions comes in the mods. Beautiful glorious mods. Bethesda games, especially Fallout and Skyrim are especially known for the absurd number of mods by the community, from gameplay overhaul, graphics overdrive, hilarious add-ons, and even controversial sex mods. It is because of mods that both Fallout 4 and The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim are still one of the most played single player games on an on-going basis.

Hopefully, the newest Fallout will finally win the hearts of those who were dissatisfied with the 4th game.

EDIT: It has been revealed by Bethesda that the game will be called Fallout 76. Stay tuned for our next article for further details.